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HOLMES LIME COMPANY

PART ONE - The LIME KILNS

The inspiration for this model structure came from a photograph of the “Holmes Lime Company” that was located in Santa Cruz County, California, south of San Francisco. It was published in the May/June 2009 edition of the “Short Line & Narrow Gauge Gazette (pages 50/51) as part of an article by Paul Scoles. I was fortunate to visit Paul and see his beautiful layout, and being a structure diorama builder myself with a liking for industrial scenes, was really impressed by Paul's lime kilns, so when this photograph at left was published I just had to build my version.

Lime is made when crushed limestone is heated in a kiln to release the carbon dioxide. The resulting lime is then crushed to a fine powder for industrial use. Lime had many uses: for example as plaster in “lath and plaster’, as brick mortar and as whitewash on timber.  

This model is the first of three structures which will form a large diorama showing the flavour of this photograph. These structures will be the kilns (displayed here), the processing plant and the warehouse.

First I needed to draw some plans of the first structure in the set - the Lime Kilns. I didn't have room to build the diorama  exactly as the prototype, so needed to reduce the structure but still retain the character and flavour. Hopefully I have achieved this, but leave you to be the final judge.

Computer Aided Drawings were done for this structure, with the front elevation seen here. Drawings of the other three will follow, with the next being the processing building, which will be similar to kiln building, being an open structure so the inner working can be seen.

Below are several photographs of progress so far.
PART TWO - THE CRUSHING PLANT & THE WAREHOUSE
I eventually completed this diorama with the addition of the crushing and bagging structure, seen here in the middlewhile the warehouse on the left. the whole structure is held together by the continuous decking that all the structures sit on.